A Tropical Travel Blog
by Cate Lincoln

If there’s a holy grail of all hikes in Hawaii, it’s got to be the Kalalau Trail on Kauai. This 11-mile trek takes hikers into the heart of the Napali Coast, which is only seen by boat, by air, or on this hike. The trail starts at Ke’e Beach and ends at Kalalau Beach where there’s a campground. You have to have a permit for the campground, and since this hike requires two days (22 miles round trip), you essentially need a permit to do the full hike. This hike is super popular (a bucket list item for many) so you have to plan pretty far in advance to make this happen.

Hiking Kauai’s Kalalau Trail

If you didn’t come quite so prepared for a 22-mile hike and the thought of it makes you want to reach for the nearest bag of donuts, don’t worry-you can still catch those ah-mazing views! The first two miles of the Kalalau Trail are open to day hikers (no permits required). If you’re only going to do one hike on Kauai, make this it! Don’t be scared off by harrowing tales of overnight hikers who had to cross 18” ledges with a sheer drop off into the ocean below, the first two miles of Kalalau, while strenuous, are very doable.

Hiking Kauai’s Kalalau Trail

The first leg of the hike will take you to Hanakapiai Beach (2 miles in) but don’t forget you’ve got to turn around and go back the way you came so it’s really 4 miles.  I really recommend getting an early start on this hike, as it’s pretty popular.

EDIT: The parking situation at Haena State Park has changed since I did this hike and now reservations (either to park or on the shuttle) are required. You’ll find current information at the end of this post in the tips section.

Parking can be an issue (there isn’t much of it!). The trail head starts at Ke’e Beach where there are only a few spots. Once those fill up, people start parking on the mauka (mountain) side of the road. There’s a bigger lot before you get to Ke’e that might be open if you get there early enough, otherwise you’ll have to park alongside the road. We arrived about 10 AM and had to park about ½ mile away. Watch the signs because they DO give tickets. Even if you have to park and walk, it’s an easy shaded walk and you’ll pass some neat caves.

There are facilities at Ke’e Beach where you can use the restroom and fill up on water before you start. There’s an info station at the trail head and an attendant making sure day hikers know they can’t go past Hakakapiai Beach.

RELATED: Not very familiar with Kauai? Read up on the lay of the is(land) and where to stay plus my favorite beach resorts, budget hotels, condos, honeymoon resorts, family friendly resorts, luxury resorts, and boutique hotels.

Hiking Kauai’s Kalalau Trail

Hiking Kauai’s Kalalau Trail

Hiking Kauai’s Kalalau Trail

The first part of the trail is pretty steep ascent through the trees before you get to the first major view, Ke’e Beach. The snorkeling is great at this beach and getting to see the coral formations from above is pretty neat.

Hiking Kauai’s Kalalau Trail

Hiking Kauai’s Kalalau Trail

It’s not long before you’ll see the view you came for…the Napali Coast! It’s less than ½ mile until you get to the first lookout point so if you’re really not up for the full 2-mile hike to the Hanakapiai Beach, you can still see the beautiful views.

Hiking Kauai’s Kalalau Trail

Right before you reach Hanakapiai Beach, there’s a pretty big stream you’ll have to cross.

Hiking Kauai’s Kalalau Trail

Hiking Kauai’s Kalalau Trail

Hiking Kauai’s Kalalau Trail

Take a rest at the beach, but admire the water from a distance. This is NOT a swimming beach and almost 100 people have lost their lives here. The waves are rough, the currents are strong, and a rogue wave can come out of nowhere so stay away from the water!!

From the beach it’s about a mile up the valley to Hanakapiai Falls (this is an offshoot of the Kalalau Trail, not a continuation). I’ve read that the trail can be tricky to stick to and is pretty strenuous. I didn’t complete it this trip, but I hope to next time!

Hiking Kauai’s Kalalau Trail

Hiking Kauai’s Kalalau Trail

Hiking Kauai’s Kalalau Trail

The first ½ mile or so of the return was probably the toughest for me. It’s a pretty quick ascent back up from the beach and I was huffing and puffing!

RELATED: 15 Things to Do on Kauai

How to See the Napali Coast

Helicopter Tour of Kauai

Boat Tour of the Napali Coast

Side Note: If you’re looking for a rental car for your trip, I LOVE Discount Hawaii Car Rentals. They’re seriously the only company I ever use. They’ll give you the very best prices, you don’t have to reserve with a credit card or pay until you show up, you can cancel and re-book anytime if you find a better rate, and they usually have a special that adds additional drivers for no fee. It’s a no brainer. Click here to check rates for your trip.

I can’t imagine what it would be like to hike the entire Kalalau Trail (22 miles round trip!) but it’s definitely on my bucket list to try some day. If you’ve hiked it before, I’d love to hear from you!

Things to Know Before You Hike Kalalau

  • In an effort to control crowds at Haena State Park (Ke’e Beach and the Kalalau Trailhead) after the historic flooding of April 2018, parking reservations are now required. You can make them online in advance, or you can pay for a reservation on the shuttle leaving from Princeville ($11 roundtrip). Reservations can be made up to two weeks in advance (highly recommend as they book up quickly) but must be made at least a day before.
  • Take plenty of water with you! My mom and I shared a 36 oz Yeti (affiliate link) and I could have drunk a lot more!
  • This 4-mile hike takes most people 3-4 hours to complete so plan accordingly.
  • Parts of the trail can get pretty muddy and slippery. I suggest wearing something like these Keens (affiliate link) that will be okay getting wet and muddy.
  • The first viewing point of the Napali Coast we came to was insanely windy! Literally, hold onto your hat!! If your pictures don’t turn out well there, don’t worry, there will be plenty more opportunities to catch the view further on in the hike.
  • The north shore of Kauai is often rainy (that’s why it’s so lush and beautiful!) so check the weather forecast during your trip and try to pick the best day. I prefer hiking in the morning.

Thanks for sticking around and reading this whole post! It’s always my goal to provide a TON of value to YOU. To that end, lately I’ve been packing my Instagram (@hula.land) FULL of content and adventures that you might want to check out. A lot of my post captions are like mini blog posts with travel info, I’ve got IGTV review videos for luaus and excursions, and helpful story highlights like grocery store prices and hotel reviews. Not to mention that my feed is pretty much the ultimate tropical eye candy! You can follow me here and share my account with your friends! Your support really helps me to keep this blog running!

Also, if you have ANY questions about planning your trip to Hawaii, you can join my free Facebook group here. I’m in there answering questions every day and there are 5000+ other friends who have a ton of Hawaii information to share!

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save